top of page
  • Writer's pictureBri

Capital vs. Capitol—What’s the Difference?

Capital and Capitol are two words in the English language that are often confused due to their similar spellings and pronunciations. Although they may sound alike, they have very different meanings and uses. In today's English lesson I will explain the difference between Capital and Capitol and provide examples to help you understand the distinction between these two words.

Are you studying English? Sign up for my courses and boost your language learning!

Capital vs. Capitol

Capital: The word Capital has several different meanings, depending on the context in which it is used. As a noun, Capital can refer to a city or town that serves as the seat of government, such as Washington D.C., which is the capital of the United States. It can also refer to the assets or resources used by a company or individual to generate income, such as money or equipment. Capital can also be used to describe a letter that is larger and more prominent than other letters in a word, such as the first letter in a sentence or the beginning of a proper noun.

Example 1: London is the capital of England. In this example, the word Capital is used to describe the city that serves as the seat of government in England.

Example 2: The company invested a large amount of capital in new equipment. In this example, the word Capital is used to describe the resources or assets that a company invests in order to generate income.

Capitol: The word Capitol refers to a building that houses a legislative body, such as the United States Capitol in Washington D.C. The Capitol is a symbol of democracy and represents the power and authority of the government. It is often used as a meeting place for members of a legislative body, such as the U.S. Congress, to discuss and pass laws.

Example 1: The protesters gathered outside the Capitol building to demand change. In this example, the word Capitol is used to describe the building that houses the U.S. Congress in Washington D.C.

Example 2: The governor addressed the legislators in the Capitol building. In this example, the word Capitol is used to describe the building where the governor gave a speech to the members of the legislative body.

Key Differences: The key difference between Capital and Capitol is that Capital can refer to a city or town that serves as the seat of government or the assets or resources used to generate income, while Capitol refers specifically to a building that houses a legislative body. Additionally, Capital can also be used to describe a letter in a word, while Capitol cannot.


Tips to Remember:

  • When trying to decide between Capital vs. Capitol, think about the context of the sentence. If you are talking about a city or town that serves as the seat of government or assets and resources, use Capital. If you are talking about a building that houses a legislative body, use Capitol.

  • Remember that Capitol always refers to a specific building, while Capital can refer to multiple things.


Check out some more English lessons!

Looking for more intensive English courses? Become a Premium Studio Member to become a more confident English speaker.




 

Meet the Teacher

Who is Bri?


Hi, I'm Bri, an English teacher who has been teaching since 2007. Originally from the United States, I moved to Japan for University and started teaching part-time. It wasn't long before I fell in love with teaching English as a second language. Teaching ESL has become my passion, and I have been fortunate enough to travel the world while teaching students of all ages and backgrounds.



bottom of page